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Assisted Living Should be Discussed Before it is Needed - Richmond, VA

- Monday, September 23, 2013

The decision on an assisted living home to spend your twilight years in– or finding a place for a loved one – is crucial.
 
During your decision making process you need to be armed with a lot of information. It’s a big decision to make, and oftentimes people are forced into making it quickly. There may be a loved one being discharged from a hospital who needs to be admitted to assisted living. It is very important to consider what is geographically close, but the second most important thing to look at are the inspections, reviews and ratings.

Inspections are done so that families can see specific issues. Ratings and reviews can be found online, and references help as well. But, while you can investigate online, nothing replaces an in-person visit.

No amount of information that is found in writing will substitute for a visit in person to an assisted living facility. Family members need to look for themselves and speak to other residents and family members for the best source on the quality of care and life in the nursing home.

As the population ages, and health care allows people to live longer, nursing homes face new challenges.

From a regulatory standpoint, and because of the aging population senior care homes of today have typically older, more frail residents than they did 15 years ago.

One of the biggest indicators for the quality of assisted living is the time staff spends with residents. The most concrete research shows higher staffing associated with higher quality care.

Families should check to see the nurse-to-resident ratio for the facility for all shifts, especially the night shift.

However, try to address the question of assisted living communities before the need arises. The more time you have to find a home, the better you and your loved one will feel. The best thing families can do is to plan ahead.

Typically, long-term care is not discussed by family members, parents, grandparents, until it’s a crisis situation. The best thing for the kids and loved ones is to have these conversations. The information is out there, it’s just key for folks to discuss it before they need to take their next step.

For more information, contact Spring Arbor.

Excerpts - Kansas.com