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Alzheimer's Disease: How the Disease Progresses, Part IV

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, January 22, 2019

Alzheimer's stages—common behaviors as the disease progresses.

Spring Arbor, NC, VAAlzheimer's disease tends to develops slowly and gradually worsens over several years. Eventually, Alzheimer's disease affects most areas of your brain. Memory, thinking, judgment, language, problem-solving, personality, and movement can all be affected by the disease.

The last three blogs discussed the first stages of Alzheimer's Disease: Preclinical Alzheimer's disease and Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Mild Dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

Stage 4: Moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease

Moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease

During the moderate stage of Alzheimer's disease, people grow more confused and forgetful and begin to need more help with daily activities and self-care.

People with moderate Alzheimer's disease may:

Show increasingly poor judgment and deepening confusion. Individuals lose track of where they are, the day of the week, or the season. They may confuse family members or close friends with one another, or mistake strangers for family. They may wander, possibly in search of surroundings that feel more familiar. These difficulties make it unsafe to leave those in the moderate Alzheimer's stage on their own.

Experience even greater memory loss. People may forget details of their personal history, such as their address or phone number, or where they attended school. They repeat favorite stories or make up stories to fill gaps in memory.

Need help with some daily activities. Assistance may be required with choosing proper clothing for the occasion or the weather and with bathing, grooming, using the bathroom, and other self-care. Some individuals occasionally lose control of their bladder or bowel movements.

Undergo significant changes in personality and behavior. It's not unusual for people with moderate Alzheimer's disease to develop unfounded suspicions—for example, to become convinced that friends, family, or professional caregivers are stealing from them or that a spouse is having an affair. Others may see or hear things that aren't really there. Individuals often grow restless or agitated, especially late in the day. Some people may have outbursts of aggressive physical behavior.

Our last blog discussed Mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease. Our next blog will be on Severe Dementia due to Alzheimer's Disease.

For more information on Alzheimer's care, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

Self


Alzheimer's Disease: How the Disease Progresses, Part III

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, January 17, 2019

Alzheimer's stages—common behaviors as the disease progresses.

Spring Arbor, NC, VAAlzheimer's disease tends to develops slowly and gradually worsens over several years. Eventually, Alzheimer's disease affects most areas of your brain. Memory, thinking, judgment, language, problem-solving, personality, and movement can all be affected by the disease.

The last two blogs discussed the first two stages of Alzheimer's Disease: Preclinical Alzheimer's disease and Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease.

Stage 3: Mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease is often diagnosed in the mild dementia stage, when it becomes clear to family and doctors that a person is having significant trouble with memory and thinking that impacts daily functioning.

In the mild Alzheimer's stage, people may experience:

  • Memory loss for recent events. Individuals may have an especially hard time remembering newly learned information and ask the same question over and over.
  • Difficulty with problem-solving, complex tasks, and sound judgments. Planning a family event or balancing a checkbook may become overwhelming. Many people experience lapses in judgment, such as when making financial decisions.
  • Changes in personality. People may become subdued or withdrawn—especially in socially challenging situations—or show uncharacteristic irritability or anger. Reduced motivation to complete tasks also is common.
  • Difficulty organizing and expressing thoughts. Finding the right words to describe objects or clearly express ideas becomes increasingly challenging.
  • Getting lost or misplacing belongings. Individuals have increasing trouble finding their way around, even in familiar places. It's also common to lose or misplace things, including valuable items.

Last week, our blog discussed Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease Our next blog will be on Moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

For more information on Alzheimer's care, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

Self


Alzheimer's Disease: How the Disease Progresses, Part II

Joseph Coupal - Monday, January 14, 2019

Alzheimer's stages—common behaviors as the disease progresses. 

Spring Arbor, NC, VA

Alzheimer's disease tends to develops slowly and gradually worsens over several years. Eventually, Alzheimer's disease affects most areas of your brain. Memory, thinking, judgment, language, problem-solving, personality, and movement can all be affected by the disease.

Stage 2: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease

People with mild cognitive impairment have mild changes in their memory and thinking ability. These changes aren't significant enough to affect work or relationships yet. People with MCI may have memory lapses when it comes to information that is usually easily remembered, such as conversations, recent events, or appointments.

People with MCI may also have trouble judging the amount of time needed for a task, or they may have difficulty correctly judging the number or sequence of steps needed to complete a task. The ability to make sound decisions can become harder for people with MCI.

Not everyone with mild cognitive impairment has Alzheimer's disease. The same procedures used to identify preclinical Alzheimer's disease can help determine whether MCI is due to Alzheimer's disease or something else.

Last week, our blog discussed Stage 1: Preclinical Alzheimer's disease. Our next blog will be on Mild dementia due to Alzheimer's disease.

For more information on Alzheimer's care, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

Self


Alzheimer's Disease: How the Disease Progresses, Part I

Joseph Coupal - Friday, January 11, 2019

Alzheimer's stages—common behaviors as the disease progresses.

Spring Arbor, NC, VAAlzheimer's disease tends to develops slowly and gradually worsens over several years. Eventually, Alzheimer's disease affects most areas of your brain. Memory, thinking, judgment, language, problem-solving, personality, and movement can all be affected by the disease.

There are five stages associated with Alzheimer's disease: preclinical Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s disease, mild dementia due to Alzheimer's, moderate dementia due to Alzheimer's, and severe dementia due to Alzheimer's. Dementia is a term used to describe a group of symptoms that affect intellectual and social abilities severely enough to interfere with daily function.

The five Alzheimer's stages can help you understand what might happen, but it's important to know that these stages are only rough generalizations. The disease is a continuous process. Your experience with Alzheimer's, its symptoms, and when they appear may vary.

Stage 1: Preclinical Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease begins long before any symptoms become apparent. This stage is called preclinical Alzheimer's disease. You won't notice symptoms during this stage, nor will those around you.

This stage of Alzheimer's can last for years, possibly even decades. Although you won't notice any changes, new imaging technologies can now identify deposits of a protein called amyloid beta that is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. The ability to identify these early deposits may be especially important in the future as new treatments are developed for Alzheimer's disease.

Additional biomarkers—measures that can indicate an increased risk of disease—have been identified for Alzheimer's disease. These biomarkers can be used to support the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, typically, after symptoms are evident.

There are also genetic tests that can tell you if you have a higher risk of Alzheimer's disease, particularly early-onset Alzheimer's disease. As with newer imaging techniques, biomarkers and genetic tests will become more important as new treatments for Alzheimer's disease are developed.

Our next blog will be on Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) due to Alzheimer's disease.

For more information on Alzheimer's care, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

Self


How to Find the Best Senior Living Community for Your Loved One

Joseph Coupal - Monday, January 07, 2019

Spring Arbor, NC, VATransitioning a loved one to a senior living community can be a difficult decision. With so many senior living choices and communities available, how do you select the best option for your loved one?

Finding the right assisted living community takes time and research. Below are some questions to ask when visiting a senior living community to help you make an informed decision:

What type of daily activities and events are planned?

Speak to the Activities Director to learn more about their approach to mental stimulation and social interaction, as both are important factors in sustaining positive mental health. Ask for a copy of the monthly calendar to see what types of activities are offered on a daily, weekly and monthly basis. In addition, ask about their community amenities and what makes this senior living community different from all the others.

How do you make residents and loved ones feel welcome?

Look closely at the community and people as you tour. Do the residents and team members look happy? Do they smile and say hello? It’s important to be observant and take the time to talk to residents and team members about their experience at the community.

Is your community up-to-date on annual inspections?

Check that the community has a valid license, history of state inspections and website information – including how often it’s updated. In the United States, individual care communities are licensed through the state’s department of health. The department of health can provide background information as well as any violations and/or complaints.

Are there financial benefits that my loved one is qualified for at your community?

If you have never considered long-term senior care before, seeing the price may instantly shock you. According to Forbes, the median annual cost of long-term senior living care was $45,000 in 2017. However, there are many financial benefits for which your loved one may qualify. For example, veterans are eligible for the Veterans Aid and Attendance Pension Benefit and many seniors qualify for Medicare. It is important to research to see if you or a loved one qualifies for any financial resources.

We believe it’s how you live that matters, and in the end, it’s about the care, the teamwork of the staff, and the overall happiness of residents in senior living communities that matter. For more information, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive


Happy Holidays from Spring Arbor Living

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, December 19, 2018
Happy Holidays from Spring Arbor Living

Our warmest Holiday wishes from the entire team here at Spring Arbor Living. Calendar year 2018 was, and continues to be, a truly remarkable year and we take this moment to recognize the joy that each and every one of you has brought to our personal and professional lives. We exist because of your faith and trust in us.

As calendar year 2019 approaches, we reflect upon the foundational recognition that "your success is our success". Our New Year’s wish for 2019 is to nurture our positive and ever strengthening partnership and to deliver ever increasing value to you, your business, and your family through the entirety of 2019.

Throughout this Holiday season may you be blessed with health and surrounded by friends and family. All the best! Cheers!

#HowYouLive


Tips to Help Seniors Beat the Holiday Blues

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 17, 2018

Spring Arbor - VA, NCWhile the holiday season is a festive time for many, it can cause depression for seniors who've lost loved ones or are having health or financial problems.

Below are some tips for seniors on how to avoid feeling blue during the holidays:

Get out and about.

Ask family and friends for help traveling to parties and events or invite family and friends to your home.

Volunteer.

Helping others can be a great mood lifter. Contact local schools, churches, synagogues and mosques to find out about volunteer opportunities. Don't drink too much alcohol, which can lower your spirits.

Accept and express your feelings.

There's nothing wrong with not feeling happy during the holidays -- many people feel the same way. Talking about your feelings can help you understand why you feel the way you do.

Recognize the signs of depression,

...which include: sadness that won't lift; loss of interest or pleasure; changes in appetite and weight; sleeping much more than normal; crying often; feeling restless or tired all the time; feeling worthless, helpless or guilty; slowed thinking; thoughts of death or suicide.

If you notice that an older loved one seems depressed, lend a hand by offering to help them with shopping, transportation and preparations for get-togethers in their homes, the society advises. Encourage your loved one to talk about how he or she is feeling and acknowledge their difficult feelings.

You should also encourage your loved one to talk to a health-care provider. Many older people don't realize when they're depressed. If you believe an older loved one is depressed, tell them depression is a medical illness that can be treated and managed.

For information on caring for aging parents or loved ones, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

ABC News


Celebrating Holidays with Seniors in Assisted Living

Joseph Coupal - Friday, December 14, 2018

How to celebrate holidays when seniors live in assisted living

Spring Arbor, NC, VAHolidays in assisted living can still be fun, festive, and meaningful even if it means embracing new traditions.

The holidays are about spending quality time with people you care about. Older adults in assisted living will feel loved and included when you find ways to bring the holiday spirit to them.

Remind yourself that what’s most important is celebrating together in a way that works for the current situation.

To help you find ways to celebrate, we answer 3 top questions:

  • Should you bring your older adult home for a family celebration?
  • What should you do when an older adult is no longer aware of holidays?
  • What festive activities work well in assisted living?

1. Should I bring mom home to celebrate with the rest of the family?

If your mom doesn’t have dementia and you can handle her physical needs and transportation, going to the family home could be a great way to celebrate the holidays.

Before deciding, talk with her to see how she feels about it.

She may be concerned about getting too tired or needing help with personal care. Reassure her by explaining how her needs can be met. If she’s feeling shy or afraid that she’ll be a burden during a fun time, remind her of how much the family is looking forward to seeing her.

If your mom does have Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other cognitive impairments, it may be disorienting to take her out of a familiar environment. Staff members who know her well may be able to help you decide what would work best.

Some people with dementia enjoy festive events, but others are easily rattled by changes in routine, loud noise, or crowds. If your mom is likely to get agitated, it might be better to have a quiet mini-celebration in her room or just have a regular visit.

2. My Dad has dementia. This year, he doesn’t seem to know that it’s the holidays. Will he even know or care if I celebrate with him?

Even if your dad doesn’t seem engaged with the world, he’ll still enjoy spending time with you and family.

You may or may not want to take him out of assisted living, depending on how well he usually does with outings. If he typically enjoys going out, then it may be a good idea. If not, turn the visit into a festive occasion if that’s likely to bring him joy.

It’s a perfect time to reminisce over old photos, sing along or listen to holiday music, or admire cheerful decorations. Unless he becomes agitated or upset by the activities, noise, or change in routine, seeing you in the holiday spirit will likely brighten his day.

3. What activities can I do to celebrate the holidays with someone in assisted living?

If your older adult has dementia, a low-key approach to the holidays may work better. Overstimulating holiday activities or busy decorations could be confusing or cause agitation.

Start with a few simple decorations and smaller groups of visitors and see how things go. You can always add more or take some away depending on how they react.

For seniors without cognitive impairment, find creative ways to help them take part in family celebrations. Reassure your older adult that they won’t be forgotten or abandoned by telling them when you’ll celebrate with them.

Try these festive activity suggestions:

  • Decorate their room together – get a mini tree, use garland to make a tree-shaped outline on the wall and tape ornaments onto it, put a few decorative items around the room, or hang a wreath on the door
  • Help them think of and purchase gifts for kids or grandkids and wrap them together
  • Arrange a family visit and open presents together – it’s more fun when the whole group has presents to open
  • For family living far away, arrange video chats so they can have virtual visitors
  • Accompany them to a holiday event or meal hosted by the assisted living community
  • Sing along with or listen to holiday songs together
  • Watch a holiday-themed movie
  • Work on a holiday-themed puzzle or a fun coloring page

For more information on assisted living, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

dailycaring.com


Holiday Celebrations with Seniors Must Begin with Planning

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 10, 2018

Spring Arbor - VA, NCFor families whose senior loved ones struggle with afflictions, holidays can be challenging times. But, with a little planning and support, the festivities can still be special. Setting realistic expectations is a key to eliminating stress.

It may be difficult to look forward to the holidays when a beloved family member is not himself. Your holidays will be doubly challenging, but they can still be special for your family if you try to limit what you do.

Communicate concerns. In advance of the holidays, be candid with family and friends about your loved one’s condition and your concerns, and enlist their support. Use this season of giving as an opportunity to discuss sharing family responsibilities and to strive for family togetherness.

Set realistic expectations. Consider both what the individual with dementia is capable of and what you, as a caregiver, can handle given your demanding role. Then, put celebrations into manageable proportions. This can help decrease stress and head off feelings of depression that stem from unrealistic expectations, both for you and your loved one.

Adapt family gatherings. Since crowds, noise and altering routines can aggravate confusion and other behavioral problems, revising your get-togethers may be in order. For example, instead of entertaining the whole clan, limit the number of attendees at a holiday dinner or spread out several smaller gatherings on different days.

Pare down traditions. With round-the-clock caregiving, it may not be feasible to juggle all of your religious and ethnic observances. You can still keep traditions alive; just reduce their number to avoid feeling overwhelmed and frustrated. Ask your loved one which traditions to choose, since it will be another way to involve him.

Talk with the patient's physician and get an indication of how much they can do. Discuss with family members how much you think your loved one should try to do, based on the doctor’s recommendations. Remember that the patient may be feeling as if they are strong enough to do more, but that could be a dangerous risk. Let them know that what you’re doing is based on a doctor’s recommendations and in their best interests. Then stick to your plan. Even a short time together might be very special.

For more information on caring for an aging parent or loved one, contact Spring Arbor.

#HowYouLive

caregiverstress.com


Tips for Downsizing to a Smaller Space

Joseph Coupal - Friday, December 07, 2018

Spring Arbor, NC, VA'With less things to care for, you have more time to enjoy life'

Downsizing a home can be bittersweet — sometimes it is being done by adult children or grandchildren. They often express they feel guilty about the process — however they don't like, want or need many of their relative's things.

So, what's a graceful way to undertake downsizing?

1. Take your time, if possible

It is going to be a much larger job than you anticipated so start early. It is a huge undertaking and can often take six months to a year to clear out a house.

The job of clearing out a house is often left to adult children if elderly parents become sick before they have had a chance to do it — a stressful chore.

2. Be ruthless

When deciding what items will be moving to your new location, be ruthless. Only take items that fit your current lifestyle.

Once the sold sign goes on, the clock is ticking to moving day. However, a caution on ruthlessness for adult children helping parents downsize, remember — it's not your stuff.

If possible make sure your parents are the primary decision-makers about what to keep (with a little prodding). It's really hard for elderly parents to make such a big change so every little decision seems very important.

3. Give up your role as 'keeper of the things'

You can no longer be the keeper of the items. Stop storing things for your children/parents/friends.

4. Take only what fits

If possible, know the dimensions of the space you are moving to. Are you going from a five-bedroom house to a two-bedroom condo? Perhaps your favourite pieces of furniture will be too big.

5. Donate, give away and sell

Give yourself lots of time, hire someone to help, get a dumpster, donate as much as you can to charity.

After you get past the realization that it's just material stuff ... it is so easy. Donation is key. What a great feeling to give to organizations that really need help.

Find someone in your life that will treasure and enjoy the item as much as you do. But don't attach expectations to the items, such as being prominently displayed in someone else's home.

You could also have a yard sale, sell some items online or hire an auction house.

6. Take photos

Take a photo of your favorite things that are going to new homes. Enjoy the memories associated with the item and appreciate the role it played in your life, then let it go.

7. Don't re-accumulate stuff

Keep only the things that you would use every day and the freedom that comes with downsizing is unbelievable. Life became very easy and very stress-free.

For more information on helping a loved one downsize to an assisted living home, contact Spring Arbor.

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CBC